Media Release

The New Zealand ship Janas has recently returned from a six-week winter research voyage to the Ross Sea where scientists made the first observations of developing Antarctic toothfish embryos.
NIWA is heading out into the Hauraki Gulf this month to carry out a survey of juvenile snapper– the first of its kind for 20 years.
This weekend, after a rather cool October, the beginning of November brings out the heat.
Researchers are keeping a close eye on Owha, the leopard seal that has made Auckland Harbour her home, after she was seen bleeding from her face on Saturday morning.
Microplastics are being fed to snapper, New Zealand’s most popular recreational fish species, at NIWA’s aquaculture research facility near Whangarei in a bid to establish some baseline data about how fish are being affected.
NIWA researchers are seeking the help of divers, snorkellers and lobster potters in the Hauraki Gulf and Bay of Plenty to learn more about how rock lobster are faring.
Castle Hill attracts two types of enthusiasts – climbers and astrophotographers...
New Zealand’s changing ocean environment has prompted the call to develop a system that will keep closer tabs on information from scientific monitoring buoys so the data they produce can be shared as widely as possible.
Contraptions that resemble upside-down kitchen sinks have been placed in the Waikawa River in Southland to attract a notoriously elusive native fish species.
Air samples from the native Fiordland forest are being collected by researchers as one of the first steps in an ambitious new NIWA-led project to reassess New Zealand’s carbon budget.
Expect to hear a lot more about climate change in the news in the weeks ahead – and a lot about NIWA’s work underpinning the science that is signalling a warmer world right now and its effects in the future.
A chance discovery off the Gisborne coast five years ago is prompting a NIWA scientist to find out more about the link between a field of methane seeps bubbling out of the sea floor and submarine landslides.
On the eve of the 30th anniversary since the Montreal Protocol came into force, new research by NIWA scientists reinforces its reputation as the world’s most successful environmental treaty.
An interest in spoilers on sportscars has paid off for a Year 8 Seatoun student who won the $1000 NIWA prize for best exhibit in this year’s NIWA Wellington Science and Technology Fair.
Everything from eating brownies made with bugs to a substitute for stickers on fruit has had a scientific eye cast over it ahead of this year’s NIWA Auckland Science and Technology Fair.
Everything from traffic safety to chickens and ballet shoes has had a scientific eye cast over it ahead of this year’s NIWA Wellington Science and Technology Fair.
NIWA meteorologists are keeping an eye on an unusual atmospheric phenomenon that is amassing in the polar stratosphere.
Frustration with buying fruit and vegetables that are never ready to eat prompted a 13-year-old Tauranga girl to a design a machine to help.
A 12-year-old has taken on the most damaging honey bee parasite in the world to win the NIWA Waikato Science and Technology Fair.
Two reports released today by NIWA and the Deep South National Science Challenge reveal new information about how many New Zealanders, how many buildings and how much infrastructure could be affected by extreme river and coastal flooding from storms and sea-level rise.
A worm that feeds on bacteria and has no eyes is one of the standout stars of almost 600 unfamiliar and potentially new ocean species identified at NIWA in the past year.
EQC, GNS Science and NIWA have joined forces to further develop world-leading natural hazards risk modelling for New Zealand.
Under the light of the moon where the river meets the sea, NIWA researchers are planning to catch tiny fish that are all but invisible to the naked eye.
The first month of data from NIWA’s air quality monitoring project in Arrowtown reveals that air quality has already breached the national standard eight times this winter, including six times in the week from 19 to 26 June – in fact every time the air temperature dropped below freezing.
We’re now halfway through 2019 and NIWA climate data from the first six months tell a dramatic story of weather and climate extremes.

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