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Read about the important science being undertaken at NIWA, and how it affects New Zealanders. 

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As the world battles a deadly pandemic, New Zealand school students have been beavering away at science fair projects researching the effectiveness of our own COVID-19 protection measures.
At the bottom of the Southern Ocean, near Cape Adare in East Antarctica, lies an undersea ridge which until this month was only known by its co-ordinates: -71.2132 latitude, 172.1649 longitude.
New ways to address environmental sustainability challenges faced by the aquaculture industry have been evaluated by a group of scientists as the industry anticipates increasing export earnings to $NZ3 billion by 2035.
Coronavirus border restrictions mean six NIWA staff face four straight months at sea in a bid to keep an international ocean research project afloat.
NIWA scientists are heading to the waters around Whakaari/White Island in the Bay of Plenty next week to survey changes to the seafloor.
Among the multitude of New Zealand climate statistics there is one record that continues to be broken month after month.
New measurements from the ocean under the centre of the Ross Ice Shelf have significantly improved our understanding of the complex processes that drive melting in Antarctica.
Scientists analysing end-of-summer snowline survey photos have estimated that 13 million cubic meters of ice have been lost from just one glacier from 2016 to 2019.
What does science tell us about New Zealand eels?
For more than 20 years NIWA scientists have been nurturing three plants that are the only examples of their kind in existence.
NIWA scientists have set up air quality sensors every 100 metres across Arrowtown in what is believed to be the world’s densest air monitoring network.
This is one of the most extreme drought events for Auckland in modern times and similar to one experienced in 1993/94.
Seven weeks of lockdown has provided evidence of how pollution can vanish overnight with benefits for the environment and individuals, says NIWA air quality scientist Dr Ian Longley.
NIWA’s flagship research vessel Tangaroa will sail out of Wellington Harbour on Sunday for the first scientific voyage since the lockdown.
Please note that this will be the final Hotspot Watch update for this season. Weekly Hotspot Watches will return in the spring.
NIWA scientists are seeking help to sniff out smoke in a bid to help improve air quality in New Zealand.
Analysis of drought conditions across New Zealand this year shows it is one of the most severe on record for some regions.
Minor to moderate soil moisture decreases across the entire North Island with severe meteorological drought in parts of northern Auckland, Coromandel and southern coast of Hawke's Bay. Drier than normal conditions are still present in the top of the South Island but significant rainfall in the west.
Traffic pollution measurements in Auckland since Level 4 restrictions were eased on Tuesday have shown levels soaring even higher than those before lockdown, NIWA air quality scientists say.
Before fish Alvin Setiawan studied weta and penguins. These days he’s never far from the kingfish tanks at NIWA’s Northland Marine Research Centre at Bream Bay.

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