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An immense dome of high pressure stretched across the Tasman Sea onto the South Island yesterday, bringing the highest temperatures across New Zealand since April.
The first weekly update for the 2017-18 summer describing soil moisture across the country to help assess whether severely to extremely dry conditions are occurring or imminent.
A dramatic change in sea ice this year is likely to hamper a NIWA-led research project aiming to better understand how ice shelves will melt as the ocean warms.
An air flow extending from Australia on Thursday and Friday may bring near-record warmth to parts of the interior South Island, says NIWA forecaster Ben Noll. A large area of high pressure to the northwest of New Zealand will help steer this warm air across the Tasman Sea.
Southwest Pacific Tropical Cyclone Outlook: Near-normal season expected, but with increased activity west, reduced activity east
A new online survey is forming the basis of the National Riparian Restoration Database, which will help scientists to improve understanding of how riparian buffers benefit waterways.
A decade of scientific research into how ocean acidification is affecting New Zealand waters has led to far greater understanding of the vulnerability of our marine ecosystems, according to a newly published review.
The term “joined-up government” was coined in the late 1990s to describe the coordination modern governments need to deal with large problems.
The spread of Bonamia ostreae from Marlborough Sounds to oyster farms in Big Glory Bay (Stewart Island) could spread to the valuable wild oyster population.
Autumn and winter rain caused damaging floods and slips across New Zealand, yet again. Susan Pepperell investigates the nation's evolving skill in avoiding and coping with water.
The Deep South National Science Challenge is one of New Zealand’s most audacious collaborative projects in recent times.
Pioneering NIWA scientists are returning to the cold continent in October, this time to focus on the seabed.
NIWA has developed a smart addition to its suite of tools assisting in the planning, regulation and evaluation of water use.
It is well known that earthquakes can trigger tsunami but they can also be caused by landslides – with devastating effects.
If it wasn't for a damaged shoulder, Wills Dobson wouldn't be launching weather balloons or fixing high-precision atmospheric measuring instruments.
Since the end of June, a barge has been stationed just off Wellington’s Miramar Peninsula drilling into the seabed to find an alternative water source for the city.
Tropical cyclones forming in the south-west Pacific are becoming less frequent but those that do form are likely to be more severe.
For the past year, NIWA’s meteorologists have been on call to provide real-time, comprehensive information about weather patterns that may accelerate a fire.
The construction of improved climate information and services in Vanuatu has posed unique logistical challenges.
The Ross Sea Marine Protected Area (MPA) in the Southern Ocean will help further research into the ecology of Antarctic toothfish.

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